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Grounded in a vision of a planet protected from human suffering and the devastating social and economic consequences of COVID-19, an initial group of global health actors has launched a landmark, global collaboration for the accelerated development, production and equitable global access to new COVID-19 essential health technologies. Read their call to action here.

The European Union is responding to this call by joining forces with Canada, France, Germany, Italy (also incoming G20 presidency), Japan, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (also holding the G20 presidency), Norway, Spain and the United Kingdom to host a pledging marathon – the Coronavirus Global Response Initiative – as of 4 May 2020.

Donors are invited to continue pledging to the Coronavirus Global Response until the end of May 2020. They can choose which priority to donate to – Test, Treat or Prevent. They can also donate to the horizontal work stream of the Coronavirus Global Response, aiming to help health systems in the world cope with the pandemic.

World-leading scientists and health experts, gathered in the Global Preparedness Monitoring Board – co-convened by the WHO and the World Bank – say €7.5 billion ($8 billion) represents the immediate needs for developing solutions to test, treat and protect people, and to prevent the disease from spreading. With the Coronavirus Global Response Initiative, the EU and its partners are taking the lead in the global effort to close this funding gap.

The pledges raised will focus on the three most pressing needs:

We need new tests to rapidly diagnose the disease. These tests need to be accurate and easily accessible.

We need new treatments to minimise symptoms in coronavirus patients, so fewer people have to go to hospital.

We need new vaccines to protect people, to prevent the disease from coming back, and to allow us to return to normal life.

The funding recipients are:

  • The Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovation (CEPI) for vaccines
  • Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance for vaccine deployment (related to coronavirus)
  • Therapeutics Accelerator for therapeutics
  • UNITAID for therapeutics deployment (related to coronavirus)
  • Foundation for Innovative New Diagnostics (FIND) for diagnostics
  • The Global Fund for diagnostics deployment (related to coronavirus)
  • The World Health Organization (WHO) for health systems (related to coronavirus)

The Commission registers and keeps track of pledges but will not receive any payments into its accounts. Funds go directly to the recipients. Recipients will, however, not decide alone on the use of the donation, but deploy it in concertation with the partnership. The commitment is for all new vaccines, diagnostics and treatments against coronavirus to be made available globally for an affordable price, regardless of where they were developed.

Test

We need new tests to rapidly diagnose the disease. These tests need to be accurate and easily accessible.

Treat

We need new treatments to minimise symptoms in coronavirus patients, so fewer people have to go to hospital.

Prevent

We need new vaccines to protect people, to prevent the disease from coming back, and to allow us to return to normal life.

All new vaccines, diagnostics and treatments for the coronavirus need to be globally available, appropriate, and affordable.

This is why we need a response of unprecedented scale, speed and solidarity. Scale to prioritize the most promising technologies and innovations, speed to act fast now to accelerate the development, manufacturing and deployment of diagnostics, treatments and vaccines, and solidarity to ensure equitable access to them for all, in Europe and worldwide, regardless of where they have been developed or who has funded them.